Tenant for Death

Tenant for Death

Tenant for Death Two young estate agent s clerks are sent to check an inventory on a house in Daylesford Gardens South Kensington Upon arrival they find an unlisted item a corpse Further the mysterious tenant Coli

  • Title: Tenant for Death
  • Author: Cyril Hare
  • ISBN: 9780060805708
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Paperback
  • Two young estate agent s clerks are sent to check an inventory on a house in Daylesford Gardens, South Kensington Upon arrival, they find an unlisted item a corpse Further, the mysterious tenant, Colin James, has disappeared In a tale which uncovers many of the seedier aspects of the world of high finance, Hare also introduces his readers to the formidable InspectTwo young estate agent s clerks are sent to check an inventory on a house in Daylesford Gardens, South Kensington Upon arrival, they find an unlisted item a corpse Further, the mysterious tenant, Colin James, has disappeared In a tale which uncovers many of the seedier aspects of the world of high finance, Hare also introduces his readers to the formidable Inspector Mallett of Scotland Yard.

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      Posted by:Cyril Hare
      Published :2019-07-14T17:30:53+00:00

    546 Comment

    January 2018 reread:I found that, although it has been a long time since I read this (10 years or more), I recalled it in great detail. Even so, it was a pleasure to follow Inspector Mallett's progress as he unravels the mystery.

    Starting about thirty years ago, Dover Publications published a series of little-known English mysteries and collections of horror stories that I return to now and again. Cyril Hare (actually a jurist named Alfred Alexander Gordon Clark) published Tenant for Death in 1937. For Dover to pick it up, I assume that it had somehow gotten into public domain -- a pity for such a tight and craftsmanlike little story. Its Scotland Yard officers, Inspector Mallett and Sergeant Frant, work well with a limi [...]

    This was the first book written by Cyril Hare (Alfred Gordon Clark), 1937I enjoyed it and particularly appreciated the fact that it was available for 1.99 from for Kindle as his books are difficult to find and it doesn't appear that any others have been converted to ebooks. I have to go by reviewers who have read several of his books that they got better over time. This one introduces Mallet, a Scotland Yard Inspector who is pretty much all business without any supporting characters in his pers [...]

    Cyril Hare's first detective novel is written with style and wit. The description of a London suburb in the opening pages is proof alone of Hare's rare talent. The other reason to read this book is to see how Hare departs from the country house milieu of the Golden Age mysteries and introduces new, more modern criminals and motives from the world of high finance.

    Inspector Mallet of the YardA friend put me on to this author for which I extend my thanks. The blurb sounded good, I read the sample, so this is my first foray into the world of Cyril Hare. This is another Golden Age crime book which will fit in with my present mood as I have been re-reading Agatha Christie’s. The opening scene is set in Daylesford Gardens, mainly occupied by those retired civil servants, judges, naval officers etc who are not too affluent. The neighbourhood is past its prime [...]

    A police procedural, featuring Inspector Mallett, concerning the murder of a ruined financier. I liked Mallett and enjoyed the story, although it became a little tiresome by the end. I am not sure why the chapter with Fanshawe and his daughter was included. The tone was light with touches of humour.Sadly the interesting and important protagonists were all male; the female characters consisted of secretaries, the dead man's mistress and a gullible girlfriend.

    This is the first in Cyril Hare’s series of police procedures which begin with Chief Inspector Mallett of Scotland Yard. The time of the writing and of the book are contemporary to interwar London. One of the problems with reading some of the ‘well-known’ authors of this time is the naivete of the author’s style or just the language that is used. This is usually surmountable, but in some cases like S S van Dine’s ‘Philo Vance’ or the books of Jonathan Latimer, sometimes it’s not. [...]

    Ballantine, a business man with his hands in some fraudulent businesses, is found murdered in the home leased by Mr. Colin James. James has vanished to France and nobody seems to know much about him. Inspector Mallett is assigned to find out where James has gone, who he is, and if he really murdered Ballantine. After all, Ballantine had many enemies. I really liked the last book I read by Cyril Hare and I wanted to like this one, but I didn't. It was dreadfully dull. The first chapter was excell [...]

    A dead body is found at 27 Daylesford Gardens, and the tenant has disappeared. Inspector Mallett is not entirely surprised to find the financier Ballantine has been murdered; there were certainly enough people who had lost money in his shady schemes. And hadn't Fanshawe threatened to kill Ballantine before he was sent to prison? As Mallett sifts through motives and opportunities, it seems that no one meets all the qualifications to be the murderer. Yet Ballantine is undoubtedly dead

    I read a book by this author several months ago that I thought was the first in the series, and I was suprised at how solid it was. Most first efforts are not that great. Turns out, however, that it wasn't the first in the series.This is the first. And it's still pretty good for a first effort. I'm impressed.

    Not bad, but this book badly misses Francis Pettigrew, the usual main character/detective. Inspector Mallett is a nice enough guy, but he really doesn't have much in the way of personality, except that he likes to eat and falls asleep sometimes. It's not really enough.

    Another interesting plot. I figured out what was going on earlier than I normally do, but it was still a very intricate and interesting story. It took a little time for me to get into it, though.

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