Running Free: A Runner’s Journey Back to Nature

Running Free: A Runner’s Journey Back to Nature

Running Free A Runner s Journey Back to Nature Richard Askwith wanted Not convinced running had to be all about pounding pavements buying fancy kit and racking up extreme challenges he looked for ways to liberate himself His solution running th

  • Title: Running Free: A Runner’s Journey Back to Nature
  • Author: Richard Askwith
  • ISBN: 9780224091961
  • Page: 266
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Richard Askwith wanted Not convinced running had to be all about pounding pavements, buying fancy kit, and racking up extreme challenges, he looked for ways to liberate himself His solution running through muddy fields and up rocky fells, running with his dog at dawn, running because he s being voluntarily chased by a pack of bloodhounds, running to get hopelesslRichard Askwith wanted Not convinced running had to be all about pounding pavements, buying fancy kit, and racking up extreme challenges, he looked for ways to liberate himself His solution running through muddy fields and up rocky fells, running with his dog at dawn, running because he s being voluntarily chased by a pack of bloodhounds, running to get hopelessly, enjoyably lost, running fast for the sheer thrill of it Running as nature intended Part diary of a year running through the Northamptonshire countryside, part exploration of why we love to run without limits, Running Free is an eloquent and inspiring account of running in a forgotten, rural way, observing wildlife and celebrating the joys of nature An opponent of the commercialization of running, Askwith offers a welcome alternative, with practical tips learned the hard way on how to both start and keep running naturally from thawing frozen toes to avoiding a stampede when crossing a field of cows Running Free is about getting back to the basics of why we love to run.

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    Askwith had reached the point where he had had enough with running. Not the actual act, but the way that the sport had been hijacked by global brands whe were only interested in selling you more expensive pointless kit, the never ending drive to better yourself incrementally and the proliferation of heavily marketed extreme challenges. He wanted to return to what made him love running in the first place. A move to Northampton meant that he had the opportunity to change.He stopped pounding the pa [...]

    HmmOne reason I started Fell Running was Richard's book 'Feet In The Clouds', and I doubt I am alone. Now I have over 100 races under my belt and yet I still have the same passion and thrill every time I line up at the start. I will never win a race (although I did once come 3rd!), but I do not race to win. However, I look after my kit, I buy things that I feel enhance my enjoyment (quality footwear, shorts that don't chaffe, tops that are designed to keep the cold wind at bay when I'm in the mi [...]

    I grew very tired of hearing about his dog Nutmeg especially since many of my off-road running experiences have been compromised by poorly-controlled dogs and their indulgent owners. That said, much of what he said rang true. I just don’t think his subject-matter justified a book.

    One of my favourite books on running - mainly because I like many of the same things Richard does - country running off the beaten track.The book also raises some interesting points on the commercialisation of running and the neat packages that are presented to us.

    I run every other day in the countryside whenever possible and I'm also a natural history enthusiast so the subject matter of this book is very familiar and should be enjoyable. And on one hand it works - this has some great nature writing passages about the experience of running in the countryside and the mountains of the UK. Lots of these passages transport me into a hodge-podge of fond memories from my own runs. It's just a shame that Askwith is such a curmudgeonly prescriptivist about runnin [...]

    # Running Free, by Richard AskwithI’m not sure exactly why I started this one before Askwith’s previous book, *Feet in the Clouds*, given a putative interest in fell-running (the subject of his first book). But I'm glad I did.*Running Free* interleaves three themes: first, a polemic against Big Running, Askwith’s term for the marketised, organised and profit-motivated side of running, with some exploration of some alternative approaches. He rails against the idea that you can’t run witho [...]

    Reminded me why I love running and made me fall slightly more in love with the sport. Changed my perspective on running in difficult weather conditions, and how there is now a booming industry for specialist running clothing and equipment. The author strips running back to its basics, running without a care for performance but for nature instead.

    As someone who runs regularly and who loves the countryside, this book appealed to me when I saw it on the shortlist for the Wainwright Prize. Askwith describes how he had become disillusioned with what he calls "Big Running": the organisation of more and bigger running events with corporate sponsorship and the encouragement to spend money on expensive kit and races. He talks a lot about running for fun and running in the countryside, how he found joy by noticing the wild things around him which [...]

    I would recommend this book to someone else. I did really enjoy reading it, and found myself agreeing with just about everything Richard said. If you are not already considering going out running more in the countryside, it is pretty likely this book will convince you, especially if you have a dogat is, if you can get past the moments where he seems so intent on promoting the benefits of 'running free' and the negatives of 'Big Running' but can't quite bring himself to dismiss road running/incre [...]

    The thing about this book is that I experienced the same emotional changes that happen on some of my longer runs. I went through "I'm reading too much non-fiction, I need a novel", I went through "Methinks he doth protest too much, he's just talking to himself", I even went through "God this is dull, I think I might give up" But I also experienced tremendous exhilaration and affinity. Askwith runs with his dog, as I do and happens to have a particularly delightful breed of dog I would have chose [...]

    Richard Askwith hates the commercialisation (he would say over-commercialisation) of running and he's not afraid to tell you so! This book is about getting back to the basics of what running is all about - getting out and going for a run - dispensing with all of the hype and gear. Askwith wants us to focus on the experience of running and re-connect with nature as we do so. He thinks we are too distracted by the advertising and the brands, too focussed on the measurement, to really enjoy the act [...]

    I only recently decided to start running and have ran every day since. Probably not healthy but have promised myself a day off on my 100th straight day. I need to make sure it's now a habit. This book has really helped the process. I'd gone out and bought some gear but felt really disillusioned at the running bling on offer. There's a crazy amount of crap on the shelves and I just wanted to run through my local countryside. Then I found this book. Richard Askwith recounts his story and running r [...]

    This is a book is about getting back to the basics of running, getting out for a run, and also advocates dispensing with all of the hype and gear. The author writes of the experience of running and his re-connection with nature. It is a different take on running than the one you see in most running magazines, and is an interesting perspective. But, I felt he went too far in the other direction at times. His rants about Big Running - the commercial aspects of kit and events - became too much for [...]

    I enjoyed this book on the whole, and agree with much of what the author says. And his descriptions of his early morning runs are vivid and bizarrely engrossing. He really captures the beauty of running in the countryside, sans headphones, HRMs etc. However, his tone gets a little evangelistic when he talks about what he describes as 'Big Running'. That said, a worthy read but not a patch on Feet in the Clouds.

    There are few times in life that we do something just for the hell of it and this book made me wonder why not. Most importantly it made me lace up my shoes, leave my watch at home and just run. Not run until I had burnt x-number of calories, or run until I had reached x-number of miles and especially not run to beat some PB. Just run because I want to feel alive and make the most of what the world has given me. As far as running books go this is the best I've read - and I've read two!!

    Not quite as good as Feet in the Cloud. But it does explain the joys and benefits of Rural Running. I feel he protests too much at the corporations and 'Big Running'. Big running is better than No Running and may well lead to Rural Running. As a Rural Runner myself I think his descriptions are great and catch the spirit so well.

    A book charting the life cycle of the thoughtful runner. Askwith links obsession with PBs and Garmin watches, among the other facets of 'Big Running', to something that many won't admit - that the act of running has been robbed of 'in the moment' enjoyment. Slow it down and look around; speed it up for pure exhilaration.

    Μέτριο, εκτός από τα τελευταία κεφάλαια που το σώζει λίγο! Τρία αστέρια για το τελευταίο κεφάλαιο!

    Inspiring running book. Pees away all the commercial aspects of running and gets back to the joy of running and simple competition

    I loved this book!! "Run freely and naturally for fun in environments that make you happy". Good advice!!

    I liked the passages on running, however I did feel they were slightly ruined by incessant and unnecessary Luddite ranting. Had to abandon the book two thirds in.

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